Let’s Get Married*

Christie, as a woman, has a unique view experience writing in the mid-1900s. It seems ironic for example, when in the Murder on the Links, she creates a narrator that “prefers traditional women.” This post also shows how Christie discusses other antiquated traditions with gendered issues, like arranged marriages, and navigates them deftly.

Confessions of a Mystery Novelist...

Arranged MarriagesIn Agatha Christie’s Dead Man’s Folly, Hercule Poirot travels to Nasse House, in Nassecomb, to help his friend, detective story writer Ariadne Oliver. She’s at Nasse House on commission from its owner Sir George Stubbs; her task is to create a Murder Hunt as a part of the festivities for an upcoming fête. But Mrs. Oliver suspects that there’s more going on at Nasse House than preparations for the event. Poirot has agreed to look into the matter with her. On the day of the fête, fourteen-year-old Marlene Tucker, who was playing the part of the victim in the Murder Hunt, actually is killed. Poirot and Inspector Bland investigate to find out who was responsible. As a part of that investigation, Poirot wants to get to know the members of the household as well as possible. So he has a conversation with Amy Folliat, whose family used to own…

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